weblog

07.10.2020
12:59 EST
White mass shooter Dylan Roof famously entered a black church and shot members of the congregation. Police captured him, asked him if he was hungry, and bought him Burger King.

The treatment of (mostly white) mass shooters has oft been used as proof of the preferential treatment white people in our society receive compared to minorities. Being poor and white, however, will also easily mark you as a target for police brutality and even street execution. Being white, in most cases, is not enough to protect one from the fist of local police. While black people are killed a proportionately higher rate, the death toll of white civilians by cops is staggering.

So what is it about mass shooters that earns them such gentle handling? They are admittedly some of the most dangerous pepole police can apprehend as they rarely have a motive other than to terrorize.

Could it be that police act to protect mass shooters because they are, in fact, assets of the state? It is abundantly clear that anyone who commits this crime can expect to be well treated once the bodies are on the floor, so long as they never point the gun at the police once they arrive. They may do their damage and look forward to a life of soft incarceration - a small price to pay when the perpetrators are often trapped in a cycle of self loathing and misery before their attacks

05.17.2019
15:40 EST
How to avoid the Big 3 (google, amazon, facebook)

If a website throws a pop-up ad at you, you should be done. We all should be.

One of the benefits of capitalism and life in America is the abundance of options in consumer goods. Don't like the quality or price of one item? Check out what a competitor has to offer! Today, that abundance of options is largely an illusion. Monopolies rise as conglomerates like Pepsi and SC Johnson buy-out their competition and maintain ownership of dozens of brands. Now, the bulk of your options are actually produced by the same companies. Along with the brands, smaller markets have disappeared in favor of large corporate chains, with every store designed to be as similar as possible so customers have the same shopping experience no matter where in the country they go. Over time, we're learning to settle for whatever we can get from our limited options. This attitude, a sort of learned helplessness, is extending to other aspects of our lives.

Once upon a time, in the land of internet, there were basic sets of rules you followed to keep your computer and your data safe from the dangers that lurk out there. This was a time when capacity for memory on home PCs was still limited, and viruses and spyware could utterly cripple one's computer. So, to prevent this, there were things you just didn't do and places you just didn't go. A learned set of skills, much the same way humans used to have no problem navigating the planet without GPS and other modern conveniences.

Among that wisdom, avoid sites that
  • trigger pop-ups
  • use TOO MANY ads
  • make you sign up for anything
  • trigger any kind of automatic download or modification to your computer
Some of these were not only to safeguard your computer from malware, but simply because memory was at a premium and it wasn't worth sitting around to load a page full of ads - the same or similar content can be found elsewhere. the internet was huge then, after all. It has only grown, but it feels so much smaller. We've been corraled into fewer and fewer sites. Google is our only search engine, it controls what we find. Google's algorithms return us search results based on what we already look at, which ensures an ever-stagnating set of results. Individual websites have abandoned stewardship of their own domains in favor of operating exclusively out of social media. And why wouldn't they, that's where the bulk of the users are. And as content becomes exclusively accessible through social media, users have no choice but to engage with these platforms

In saving ourselves, we safeguard our future. We must not succumb to the allure of convenience and comfort in the face of collapse.

04.21.2019
08:36 EST
It's incredible just how manipulative the wording of news articles is becoming. It's obviously been on an increasingly rampant rise, but I was reading an article about "explosions" in Sri Lanka and the article is very careful to describe them as absolutely neutrally as possible, with no implication of what kind of explosions, who set them, or why. The article focuses on how airlines and tourists are being affected for paragraphs. You have to get halfway through the article to discover that it's another in a long series of calculated terrorist attacks the country has been suffering, and it gives no details on suspects or motives but spends only a brief sentence glossing over the fact that two luxury hotels have been targeted and 27 foreigners killed
When complaining about the affected nature of news reporting, there are two main schools of thought for ascertaining cause. Some believe powerful individuals and interests are controlling the media, others believe the media is simply catering to the lowest common denominator by means of sensationalism and shock appeal. Frankly, I think the article I described above all but proves the first of the two theories. If media was truly a "force of nature" type entity with no agenda, exploiting tragedy for clicks and sales, a story about multiple terrorist bombings with dozens of deaths including luxury hotels is a tour-de-force of attention-grabbing buzzwords and they used none of them, making the explosions sound like they could be the result of accidents for several paragraphs.
However, this could hurt tourism, and profits are at stake.

04.18.2019
13:01 EST
Gonna get back to updating and working on this site. The holidays were killing me but summer is here, work is slow, and I have free time again.
The human timeline needs reference links, and mass killers just needs to get developed past the draft stage. Everything else is going to get slowly built upon and I'm going to try to keep the news up to date

12.06.2018
13:54 EST
Trump is a symptom of America's problems, not the cause. All Trump has done is throw propriety to the wind and say in speeches and on twitter what is usually considered "behind closed doors" talk - the kind of things that are true but you don't just say in public. This has brought to the surface a lot of things that have been festering underneath the surface of our society this entire time - white supremacist ideologies being the most obvious example. They're not new, they've always been with us, most people just weren't aware of their perpetuation nor how widespread they remained while their followers operated in the shadows.

12.05.2018
18:45 EST
First blog post. hail satan